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Where’s the Book Bag?

We announced our schedule this afternoon, and within a few minutes we had heard from a number of friends of the Festival — by telephone, Twitter, Facebook, and email — asking about the Book Bag feature our website has offered for previous Festivals.
If you’re new …

Stories in Our Lives: Blake Bailey, Maureen Corrigan, Edwidge Danticat, and Katherine Paterson

This special, headline event features:

  • Blake Bailey (author of The Splendid Things We Planned: A Family Portrait, as well as biographies of John Cheever, Charles Jackson, and Richard Yates, and the designated biographer for Philip Roth),
  • Maureen Corrigan (author of So We Read On: How The Great Gatsby Came to Be and Why It Endures, and NPR book critic for Fresh Air),
  • Edwidge Danticat (author of Claire of the Sea Light most recently, and the memoir, Brother, I’m Dying), and
  • Katherine Paterson (author of The Stories of My Life, as well as dozens of children’s books, including Newbery Award winning Bridge to Terabithia and National Book Award winning The Great Gilly Hopkins).

Tim Reid hosts this discussion of stories, biographies, memoirs, and lives.

Student Poster Art Contest Begins

Virginia Festival of the Book and Altrusa International of Charlottesville are accepting entries for the annual Festival Poster Art Contest. Open to all Charlottesville and Albemarle students in grades K-12, this free-style design contest will be judged in three grade categories: elementary (K-4), middle school …

Poetry and Prose Student Contest Returns

The community once again will celebrate our middle and high school writers with the Festival’s annual Poetry and Prose celebration, Tuesday, March 17, 7:00 p.m. at the Charlottesville Omni. This year’s contest has two separate guidelines: one for high school students, grades 9-12 and one …

A 2013 Festival attendee. Photo by Pat Jarrett.

One for the Books

The Virginia Festival of the Book—the annual five-day hurrah for books, authors, and reading, is such a landmark in Virginia’s cultural landscape that it’s easy to forget it began with a few booklovers with a dream.